Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

Swedish Pancakes

We first had Swedish Pancakes during our initial visit to Minnesota, the second home of Swedish Pancakes. We landed in a blizzard to yards piled with at least 3 feet of standing snow. The tops of the snow banks touched the base of most first floor windows. We still decided to move there (and haven’t had a winter like it since). I think it was the Swedish Pancakes. But most likely, it was breakfast at Sarah’s house the morning prior that sealed the deal. Either way, Swedish Pancakes seemed to play an important role, too. 

Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

I’m mostly posting this recipe for myself. Because every time I go to make Swedish Pancakes, I can’t find the recipe. Maybe it’s because I never write titles to the recipes I keep scratched into a notebook. I kept looking for “Swedish Pancakes” to jump out at me. Though sometimes I draw hieroglyphics. This particular recipe had neither, making it very difficult to find pre-coffee. I texted the recipe to Sonja once after she asked. So when my notebook would fail me, I’d search the archives of my texts. Five minutes of searching and scrolling, and the app crashed. Always. That’s why I’m posting this recipe for Swedish Pancakes. For myself.

Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

After visiting Minnesota, we went back to our New Haven apartment where Kev focused heavily on finding a house, and I focused on finding perfect Swedish Pancakes. A quick google search turned up very few recipes. The couple that I tried were nothing like those pancakes we ate in Minnesota. I eventually found a gluten-free recipe that looked just as I remembered. After adjusting the flour ratios (gluten-free flour absorbs more than traditional flour) they were spot on. The only thing missing—a recipe title, a hieroglyphic, or a blog post.

Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

You should know, I serve these Swedish pancakes all wrong. They should be rolled and not folded like crepes. I like the filling to pancake ratio better when folded, so you’ll just have to forgive me on this one. But I do serve them with the traditional lingonberry jam procured from Ikea. (Minnesotans, can you recommend a good lingonberry jam?) And like everything, we top it with plain whole milk yogurt, coconut, and pure maple syrup.

Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

So what’s the difference between a Crepe and Swedish Pancakes? If a Dutch Baby and a Crepe had a baby, it’d be Swedish Pancakes. They’re slightly thicker than a Crepe but more eggy in texture like a Dutch Baby. Traditionally, Crepes need an overnight rest before hitting the hot griddle, whereas the batter for Swedish Pancakes is ready to go after a 5 minute nap.

Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

Molly and Eggboy and Sonja and Alex came over for Swedish Pancakes late last year. We topped them with thinned chocolate hazelnut butter, sautéed apples, and yogurt whipped cream. If you’re not a traditionalist, the toppings are endless.

So long story short, I’m not sure why I’m telling you all of this. Because I’m posting this recipe for myself. But I do hope it wiggles its way into your weekend line-up too.

Swedish Pancakes | @thefauxmartha

Print

Swedish Pancakes


  • Yield: 10 pancakes 1x

Description

Swedish Pancakes are thin and eggy pancakes, traditionally served rolled with lingonberry jam. If a crepe and a dutch baby had a baby, I think they’d call it a Swedish Pancake.


Scale

Ingredients

  • 3 tbsp. melted butter
  • 2 c. whole milk
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 c. all-purpose unbleached flour
  • 1/2 tsp. kosher salt
  • Filling
  • lingonberry jam
  • plain whole milk yogurt
  • pure maple sryup

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan melt butter. Set aside to cool.
  2. Into a high-powered blender, add in milk and eggs. Blitz on medium speed until mixture has about doubled in size, about 20 seconds.
  3. Add in the cooled melted butter, flour, and salt. Blitz again for another 10-20 seconds. All the flour should be evenly incorporated. Scrape down sides if necessary and blend again. Set aside.
  4. Preheat a 10″ non-stick pan on medium-high heat for about 5 minutes. This will give your batter a little time to rest and your pan enough time to get hot.
  5. Once ready, holding the pan slightly off the burner, pour batter into the center of the pan until it’s about an inch shy of the bottom edge of the pan. Swirl the pan around several times as you would a crepe until the batter stops. Return to the burner and cook until the edges begin to brown, about 1-2 minutes. Using a very thin spatula, carefully peel around the edges and then slide the spatula halfway under the pancake. Flip quickly and allow to finish cooking, about 30 seconds-1 minute.
  6. Slide off onto a plate. And repeat. Note! It’s not uncommon for the first pancake to flop. Molly calls this a snack cake. Don’t throw it out in anger like me. Snack on it.
  7. Fill with lingonberry jam and plain yogurt, then top with maple syrup.

Recipe Card powered by
Recipe adapted from Mister Belly.
(Visited 8,990 times, 4 visits today)
Tagged with →