How to make good coffee at home | @thefauxmartha

There are more important things that need protecting in this world than my morning coffee routine. But I protect it because there are more important things in this world. Coffee fuels those efforts. Quick and fast are heralded words these days. I like to apply those terms to my weeknight dinners. But with a new day soon to be swept away with 10,000 to-dos, I like to start my mornings slow. With pour over coffee that requires a quiet and steady attention. Hallie now knows our coffee time is sacred time. She pulls out two enamel mugs from the drawer. “Oh, here you go mommy.” We cheers with our pretend coffee while I continue attending to the real coffee. This all started after going to a coffee cupping, much like a wine tasting, during our time in Chicago. I fell in love with the nuances in flavor and the brewing technique. I’ve been making pour over coffee since, 3+ years and counting. Here’s a guide to making really good coffee at home. Read more

Salted Nutella Latte | The Faux

Things are on repeat around here. Nutella, Nutella, Nutella. I wasn’t going to share this recipe until I mentioned it last post and a couple of you said—forget the buttercream, show us the latte. Or something like that. I heard you. There’s a Salted Nutella Latte, extra shot, light foam, no whip, easy on the sweetener, ready on the bar for you.  Read more

Are you as last minute and scattered as me? For your sake, I hope not. But just in case, I’ve prepared a little gift guide for the foodie on your list. Here are a few of my favorite things from this past year. Read more

Any barista will tell you that one key to a great pour over or french press is the “bloom”. Grind your coffee fresh, and when you put it in the press or the Chemex or cone dripper, pour just enough hot water over the grounds to get them completely wet and then let it sit for about 30-45 seconds. Freshly roasted and ground coffee will release the carbon dioxide and other gasses that tend to hinder extraction of coffee goodness into your cup. You’ll see the coffee grounds start to rise like bread. After the 30 seconds go ahead and finish pouring.

—Eric, FreshGround Roasting